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Olive Python Care Sheet

Olive Python Care Sheet

                                 (Liasis Olivaceus)Olive Python Care

The Olive Python is one of Australia's largest snakes, being exceeded in length only by the Oenpelliensis Python and the Scrub Python. It has a long head distinct from neck, body long but robust and loose-skinned. Dorsally its colour is generally drab olive green to pale fawn or rich brown, merging on the lower scale rows with the creamy white ventral surface. The lips are cream in colour, finely dotted with pale grey or brown. The Olive Python averages 2.5 metres in length but specimens over four metres have been recorded. As with a lot of Pythons they can be a bit snappy as juveniles, but once one year and over Olive Pythons can become one of the best handling snakes available.

Housing

As adults Olive Pythons will require a very large enclosure. At least 8ft x 3ft x 3ft will be needed with the bigger being better. As with all pythons a good temperature gradient is required. A warm end of 35 celsius with a cool end of 26 celsius would be ideal. Ceramic or infra red globes are the best way to achieve this and should be connected to a good quality thermostat to ensure over heating does not occur. Recommended substrates are paper, Kritters Crumble, Reptibark and Aspen Snake Bedding. Olive Pythons are partially arboreal so some branches to climb on should be placed in the enclosure. As with all pythons a hide hole should be made available. In the wild Olive Pythons are excellent swimmers so the use of a very large water bowl is also recommended.

Diet And Feeding

The diet consists of birds, mammals and other reptiles, including rock-wallabies, fruit bats, ducks and spinifex pigeons. They prefer to lie in wait next to animal trails to ambush their prey. Alternatively, they are strong swimmers and also hunt in water holes, striking at prey from under the water. In captivity defrosted rats, rabbits and quail are the most prefered food items. Live food is not recommended at any stage as they can cause serious damage to your python. As juveniles a weekly feed is recommended and as adults a feed every other week is sufficient.